Percussion Tip #1

1129939_21193_popupOn Friday, I posted three tambourine videos by Christopher Deane, Associate Professor of Percussion at the University of North Texas. (If you missed them, stop reading and go watch them. It will be the best 10 minute investment that will improve your tambourine technique forever.)

Periodically, I plan to post tips and tricks that I have learned and used over my experiences playing percussion. Since I posted the tambourine videos on Friday, I wanted to start with a tambourine tip. If you watch the first Christopher Deane video, you will notice that he is playing an incredible finger roll (sometimes called the thumb roll) in the Britten excerpt. I call it a finger roll because he is using his second finger. (BTW, I prefer that way for soft rolls, but I will talk more about it when I post my tambourine technique videos.) If you are not familiar with soft roll technique on a tambourine, you may wonder how he is able to do this. There are many ways to execute the soft roll and they all require putting something on the tambourine head. This leads to today’s tip: (more…)

Christopher Deane Tambourine Masterclasses

Christopher Deane, Associate Professor of Percussion at the University of North Texas, discusses some specialized tambourine techniques in three masterclass videos that feature the Black Swamp Percussion Tambourine. There is a lot of great information in these videos and I would highly recommend checking these out over the long weekend.

Masterclass 1: Delicate Roll and Articulation Techniques

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpR5QY7_sv0

Masterclass 2: One Handed Triplets

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIb8DMq9Fhc

Masterclass 3: “Opposable Thumb” Technique

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paOHFZh3oH4

Episode 018: 5,7,9 Stroke Rolls

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bt4yLHTxXAw

In today’s episode we take the next step in our double stroke rolls and talk about 5, 7, 9 stroke rolls. When executing bounced strokes, make sure you are letting the stick do all of the work. If you have a good fulcrum, a relaxed grip and you allow the stick to bounce, over time you will develop a good sounding roll. Remember: One Arm Stroke, Two Bounces.

Please feel free to leave comments and/or questions below.

Level: Beginning/Intermediate

Snare Drum Roll Exercise

Innovative-CL2L-300x300A couple of months ago, I introduced a new Snare Drum Roll Exercise. I hope this has helped develop your roll technique.

In the past couple of episodes of my videos, I have begun to talk about the bounced stroke. For most students, this is the most difficult rudiment on the snare drum. If you don’t believe me, go to a high school band concert. I find most students push too hard and don’t allow the stick to do most of the work.

In this exercise sheet, I have created an additive process exercise that starts with one bounce on a note and adds one bounced stroke per line. In the first measure, the foundation is introduced followed by the bounced stroke in the second measure. One of the goals was to make sure to that both hands were working on the bounced strokes.

Additive Roll Exercise

Check it out for a couple of days and let me know what you think. Any feedback and/or comments are appreciated.

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