Year in Review: Top Posts of 2016

Thank you for your continued support and here’s to more percussion education in the coming year. It would be great to hear from you. Please leave a comment below and say hi. Happy New Year! Here are the top 5 posts from 2016.

1) On Student Attendance at Faculty Performances: Dr. Tracy Wiggins wrote a great article on the importance of students attending recitals. Read it and share it with your students.

2) Jeff Porcaro plays Rosanna: One of my all time favorite drummers playing the classic groove to Rosanna. Even if you are not a drumset player, you will appreciate this amazing video. Last year this was #1 and it remains in the top 5 again this year.

3) The Greatest Snare Drum Tuning Trick: Every time I watch this video, I always wonder how long the counterhoop will remain flat and round?

4) Snare Drum Head Showdown: A showdown of 14 drum heads in one video.

5) Episode 026: Composing using the Rudiments: Rounding out the top 5, this post continues to be popular. In the coming year, I hope to create more videos about composing.

Year in Review: Top Posts of 2015

percussion_education_top_posts_2015

It has been a fun year and I appreciate everyone who has visited the site over the past year. Thank you for your continued support and here’s to more percussion education in the coming year. It would be great to hear from you. Please leave a comment below and say hi. Happy New Year! Here are the top 5 posts from 2015.

1) Jeff Porcaro plays Rosanna: One of my all time favorite drummers playing the classic groove to Rosanna. Even if you are not a drumset player, you will appreciate this amazing video.

2) Episode 026: Composing using the Rudiments: Over the past year, I have been writing some new snare drum pieces. I will be sharing these soon. I hope to see some of your pieces as well.

3) Why Do We Study Music?: A great justification of why we study music. Thank you TED Ed.

4) Vic Firth Marimba Literature Library: VicFirth.com is a destination website for a lot of percussion content. Go spend some time check out the site.

5) Fractalia by Owen Clayton Condon: Great piece by Owen Clayton Condon performer by the Third Coast Percussion Ensemble.

Drum Pad Resources

BDL_4132

The last two episodes have featured my reviews about different drum pads that are available. Check them out here:

Episode 016: Practice Pad Reviews Pt. 1

Episode 017: Practice Pad Reviews Pt. 2

In the videos, I talk about the two types of drum pads: rubber and drumhead. Both types of pads have their advantages and disadvantages. For most of my warmups, I use the bdl Percussion Pad, because I really like the feel and sound. If I am relaxed, I can hear the vibration of the stick. I have never had that experience with any other pad and that is one of the reasons that I endorse their drum pads. (Full Disclosure, I endorse bdl Percussion and Remo). In my studio, I use the Remo pad if a student is playing through a piece for the first time.

But remember, a drum pad will never replace a drum. It does have the same feel and if you always practice on a pad, your sound on a snare drum will suffer. In general, I use a drum pad for warmups and when I am learning or working on a new piece. If I am playing snare drum on a concert, I will make sure that I use a snare drum leading up to the performance.

Below are the links of the different pads that I used in the videos. Please support these companies. They are making great products.

Recommended:
Remo 8″ Practice Pad with Stand

bdl Percussion

Other Examples:
Remo 6″ Practice Pad

Remo 8″ Practice Pad

Remo 10″ Practice Pad

RealFeel – 6 Inch

RealFeel Apprentice Pad Stand

Destiny Pro Pad

RamPad – Symphonic Series Blue

Remo Putty Pad

Snare Drum Roll Exercise

Innovative-CL2L-300x300A couple of months ago, I introduced a new Snare Drum Roll Exercise. I hope this has helped develop your roll technique.

In the past couple of episodes of my videos, I have begun to talk about the bounced stroke. For most students, this is the most difficult rudiment on the snare drum. If you don’t believe me, go to a high school band concert. I find most students push too hard and don’t allow the stick to do most of the work.

In this exercise sheet, I have created an additive process exercise that starts with one bounce on a note and adds one bounced stroke per line. In the first measure, the foundation is introduced followed by the bounced stroke in the second measure. One of the goals was to make sure to that both hands were working on the bounced strokes.

Additive Roll Exercise

Check it out for a couple of days and let me know what you think. Any feedback and/or comments are appreciated.

From the Pit of Wicked


I’ve been busy this week getting Broadway Across America’s Wicked up and running for a 3 week Austin tour. Those of you who have played it know the challenges at hand. So significant, in fact, that the Percussive Arts Society Rhythm! Discover Center museum has dedicated a portion of an exhibit with pictures and set up maps.

In other ways of using technology to learn from each other there is an informative Facebook group page entitled Wicked Percussionists. And, of course, two episodes of Percussion Axiom TV dedicated to issues involved of my original run of the show in 2009.

What resources can you recommend to readers that can help someone else prepare for a gig? Leave your thoughts in the comments.

Originally posted on DrummChattr.com on January 26, 2012 by Thomas Burritt.

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